BROAD YORKSHIRE - THE LANGUAGE OF PARADISE
BROAD YORKSHIRE - THE LANGUAGE OF PARADISE

A Glossary of Broad Yorkshire Dialect

The Tongue of my Beloved Yorkshire and the Language of my Childhood

  

  

Addle, ...............To earn 

Agate, ...............At work, occupied with 

Agate,................For a short way as is, “I’ll gan agate wi thi.”

Agate,................a little way

Aimbry,..............Almondbury, a township of Huddersfield mentioned in the Doomsday Book

A’ll,....................(sounds like ‘al’) I will

‘appen,..............perhaps

'Akkle, ..............To dress or tidy up, also to manage, as 'ackle 'er brass!' 

'Avverbreead, ...Haverbread made from oatmeal when wheat flour was expensive 

Aye,...................Yes

  

Baht, .................Without 

Bahn,.................Going, bound

Bairn,.................A Baby

Balk, ..................A large beam or beam of scales for weighing 

Bat or Stroke,.....'He's not struck a bat' - he's not done a stroke 

Betty,..................A guard placed in front of the fire to keep the ashes in, also known as a Tidy Betty

Billy, ...................A machine for slubbing cardings 

Blether,...............Complain, whinge

Blithering, ..........(adj) confounded, as in “You blithering idiot!”

Botch,................To do a job carelessly, or artrlessly

Brass, ................Money 

Brat,....................A child, or an apron.

Brokk’n,.............. Broken 

Brig,.....................A bridge

Brussen, .............Burst (applied to sacks); lucky (applied to a person) , overfed (person)

Bust/busted,........Broken

Buffet,..................A small stool 

Buffet,.................To strike or slap, especially at the side of the head 

Bunt, ..................A bundle (of cloth) 

Burl, ...................Pick small pieces of yarn or hair etc. from cloth 

Buzzer, ...............Mill whistle or siren 

  

Caird, .................A card or comb for dressing wool 

Cal, ....................Gossip 

Capt, ..................Surprised 

Causey, ..............A pavement, footpath , causeway

Causey edge,.......Kerb

Chip ole or oil,......Fish and chip shop

Chunter, ..............Grumble ineffectually

Clammed or clemmed,

.............................Cold; hungry, short of food 

Clicks,...................Hooks for moving packs of wool 

Clinker,.................Hard cinder found in furnaces

Claarts, claahts, or clouts, ..Clothes

Claht eead,............Cloth head.  A term of opprobrium.

Cloise or close,......Field, perhaps from enclosure 

Clooathes,..............Clothes

Cloth ears,..............Unwilling to hear though able to

Cop,.......................Yarn spun on a spindle 

Cop,.......................Catch, or take hold of

Cossie,...................Swimming costume

Cropper, ................Cloth dresser 

Crozzil or Crozzle, ..Hard cinder found in furnaces, cooked crisp, as bacon 

Cut,.........................Canal 

  

Din, .........................Noise, racket

Do, ..........................A commotion, a party, a lively time 

Donned up, .............Dressed in ones best clothes 

Druft,........................A drying wind, a draught

  

Ee,............................Exclamation

Ee ‘eck!,....................Expression of shock or surprise 

‘E,He, ........................him

Ee ‘ad,.......................He had 

He an't.......................He has not

‘Eead or ‘Eeyad,........Head

‘ey,.............................A cry to attract a person’s attention

‘ey up,........................hello

‘ey up,........................what’s happening?

‘ey up,........................whatever is the matter?

‘ey up,........................That looks strange!

  

Fether,.........................Father

Feyther,.......................Father

Fadge, ........................Bundles of cloth or wool in a pack sheet skewered with wooden pricks 

Fast, ............................Puzzled or stuck 

Fearnaught, ................A brand of wool mixing machine 

Fent, ............................A fag end of cloth, three-quarters of a yard beyond the length of a piece. Weavers used to claim .....................................these to clothe their children 

Fettle, .........................To clean, especially used of mill machinery, or set something in order 

Fettler, .........................A machine cleaner 

Flags,...........................Paving stones.

Flibbertygibbert,...........Empty headed girl

Flit,................................Move 

Fold, .............................A yard, field, or a collection of houses standing in a yard 

Frame, ........................To set about a task effectively 

Fruzzins, ......................Hairs coming off the cloth when finished or from yarn when wound. 

  

Gaffer,....  ......................The boss or foreman

Gainest, ........................Nearest 

Galluses,........................Braces

Gang or gan,................. The verb ‘to go’.

Gers, .............................Grass 

Gig, ................................A kind of knife used to remove knots from the cloth 

Give Over!........................Stop it!    Stop that!

Goit, ...............................Channel cut to carry water to the mill 

Ginnil,or Ginnel .  ............A narrow passage between buildings 

Gyp or jyp,.......................Pain, punishment, or a severe telling off

  

Hank, ..............................Thread wound on a large cylinder. A hank of wool or cotton is 840 yards; 560 yards in worsted 

Heft,................................Carry 

'Od                                   Hold, as ion, "Tak 'od o' this!'

  

‘Ooam,                            Home 

Oppen or opp’n,................Open 

  

Jacks, .............................Part of a loom 

Jerry, ...............................A finishing machine that removed rough surface of cloth, a bit lahke a croppin' machine

Jip or gyp,Pain, ................punishment, or a severe telling off

Joss, ..............................The master , or ''t maister'

  

Ketch,...............................to catch

Knock on, ........................To get on with a job 

Koil Oil/’ole, .....................Coal place as in 't place wheer tha keyps thi coil!

Kop, ...............................Catch 

  

Lake, ..............................To be idle, to play or have no work

Leck or weet, ...................To wet as in wetting the cloth with stale urine to bring out the grease 

Leet, ...............................To meet with 

Leet geen [sp?].................Too fond of lasses

[as] leet a an 'ayseed.........too fond o't lasses

Lig, ..................................Lie down 

Lithairse, ..........................Dye house; 

Lister,...............................A dyer 

Loose ..............................fluff, often under a bed 

Lug, (n).............................Ear

Lug, (v)..............................Pull or carry

Lug ‘ole,............................Ear

  

Lumb, ..............................Chimney 

Lurry, ...............................A wagon, lorry 

  

Mah-th,..............................Mouth

Maister, Master 

Maun,Must

Maund thissen,Watch out

Midden,WC

Middlin’, Moderate, or fair (health)

Miln, A mill 

Milner, Originally the one who put the cloth in the milling stocks 

Milliner.............................Ladies hat maker

Mongi, Idle 

Mule, Spinning machine 

Mullock, Mess or muddle 

Muff, Make a small noise 

Mungo, Old rags and woollen material, shredded to be rewoven 

Mun,Must

  

Nah then,Hello

Nah then,what’s this?

Nah then,How are you?

Nah then,I don’t believe you

Nah then,Stop that!

Naw,No

Nob’dy, or Nubdi.....................No one

Noan,.....................................Not 

Nogs, ....................................L-shaped pieces of iron placed on the beam to hold the warp 

Noils, Short fibres of wool removed by the combing machine 

Noit, Business 

Nope, To hit, especially on the head 

Nooa,No

Nooan,Not

Norther,Neither

Nowt,Nothing

  

Okker, To hesitate 

‘Ole,Hole, or place.

Ollis, Always 

On’t th’ed,On the Head

Oss,To stir; move, to begin 

Owt, Anything 

  

Paand, Pound (£1)., also to beat (pound upon) 

Perch, To examine cloth by putting it over a rod, pole or perch, in order to remove burls or motes 

Pick, To throw the shuttle 

Pick,The line of weft laid through the weft

Piggin, A lading can used to transfer hot water from the boiler or copper into the wash tub or vat, or other small vessel 

Poise,Kick 

Porty, woof 

Posser,A device for possing clothes.

Pund, Pound (lb) weight 

Put’t’wood in’t th’ole,Close the door

  

Rant,A Fair

Rant,To gob on abaht summat

Raht,An intensifier meaning ‘very’

Real,Good or outstanding

Reet,An intensifier meaning ‘very’(Right meaning very).

Right,an intensifier meaning ‘very’.

Rordin, A Riding; a third part 

Rovin, In wool spinning where the filaments are drawn out to a greater length 

Rush,A festival 

  

Saig, Saw 

Saigins, Sawdust 

Sam, To pick up or gather, to lift

Scoow-il,School

Scribble, To give the first rough carding to wool or cotton 

Sharp,quick, as in “Look sharp!”

Shauve, Slice (of bread) 

Shift thissen,Move yourself

Shiftless, Feckless

Shivvins, Small bits of wood or shavings in the wool or bits off the yarn  (shavings) 

Sh’in’tin,She is not at home

Shi’ll nooan,She will not

Shi-waint,She will not

Silin’,Raining

Sithee,Look here (See, thee)

Shoddy, Waste material thrown off by machines, used for low priced cloth 

Skep or skip, A willow basket 

Skitter,To hurry one's work 

Slaace,Slice

Slawit,Slaithwaite, a small township of Huddersfield

Sliver, A long carding of wool; a splinter of wood 

Slub, To draw out cardings into greater length 

Sluffed, Disappointed, distressed 

Stamperds, The four posts supporting a loom 

Splahwt,Splatter

Starved,Feeling cold 

Starved,Hungry

Stocks, Part of milling machinery 

Strinkle, To scatter or sprinkle 

Summat,something

Sumpoil, Sump hole – the place to which surplus liquids flow 

  

T’,The

Taew or Tow,To strive 

Tay,Tea

Tail goit, Channel from the mill; tail-gate

Tenter, Frame for stretching cloth to dry on tenter hooks 

Tenterer,The tenter operator

Th’,The

Tha,You, thou

Thahn,Yours (thine) 

Tha’ll,You will

Tha a’n’t,Thou hast not (you have not)

Tha mun,You must

Tha munt,You must not

Tha’ll no’an,You will not

Tha wain’t,You will not (imperative)

Tha Wot?,You what? (what did you say/mean)

Ther wer,There was 

Thi or Thee,You

Thahn,Thine (yours)

Thine,Yours

Think on!,Remember!

Thissen or thyssen,Yourself (thyself)

Thoil,To bear; endure; not begrudge; spare 

Throng, Busy 

Thrum, The short ends of the warp cut off from a piece of cloth 

Thump, Local name for a feast or fair 

Tag or Tig, To touch (as in children’s games) 

Toit,To keep in toil; to keep in good order 

Tuner, One who tunes or sets the looms for weaving 

  

Ummer, Local word for Hell, emphasised as ‘bloomin ummer’

Us,Our, eg, “We’re off on us ‘olidays”

Umpteen,Countless

Uppards,Upwards

  

Wain’t,Will not

Wafter,A piece of rag used to cause a draught to scatter fluff

Wallop,Hit, strike

Wallop,Beer

Wanty, A girth for a pack horse 

Wappy, Quick; a short cut

Wind, To wind yarn onto bobbins 

Watter,Water

Wassup?,What is wrong?

Wim wam, An impulse or fancy, a name given to an imaginary perch for ducks 

Winteredge, Winter hedge; clothes horse 

Wit, Common sense 

Worsit,Worsted 

Wom, Home 

  

Yark, To jerk; pull or snatch

Yeead,Head

Yeed,Head

Yetton,Kirkheaton, an ancient township of Huddersfield

Yo’arn,Yours

  

Yorkshire Phrases

  

Ah dooant nooaa -I don’t know

Ahm bahn wham - I’m going home

Allus at t’ last push up- Always at the last minute

Ah wer or Awer famished- I was hungry

Ah wer fair famished- I was extremely hungry

‘As ee bin in? -Has he been here?

E’s goin’ dahn t’ nick- His health is failing

Ah wor fair starved - I was very cold

A reight gooid sooart- A good and kind person

’E wor ’ard on- He was fast asleep

‘E teks a good laak’ness- He is photogenic

Gerraway -Get away  (hard ‘G’ as in ‘Gun’)

Gerrawaywiyer -Get away with you (statement of disbelief)

Gerroff- Get off

Gerroffit- Get off it

Gerronwi’it - Get on with it! 

Gerronwithi - I don’t believe you

It caps owt- It beats everything

It’s nut jannock- It’s not fair

Nobbut a mention - Just a small amount

Shintin - She isn’t at home

Well, ah’m fair capped!- I am very surprised

Worshein- Was she in?

Livin’ tally- Living together as if married, but without benefit of clergy

Livin’ ower t’ brush - Living together as if married, but without benefit of clergy

Put ‘t t’wood in’t ‘t’oil- Put the wood in the hole (Close the door)

Wats ta getten?- What hast thou gotten? (What have you got?)

Wats tha getten?- What hast thou gotten? (What have you got?)

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

  

 A Powem I’ Brooad Yarksha

(A Poem in Broad Yorkshire)

  

  

Mi Native Twang

By John Hartley - 1898

  

In the Broad Yorkshire Dialect               

  

THEY tell me aw'm a vulgar chap,

An ow't to goa to th' schooil

To leearn to tawk like other fowk,

An net be sich a fooil;

  

But aw've a nooashun, do yo see,

Although it may be wrang,

The sweetest music is to me,

Mi own, mi native twang.

  

An when away throo all mi friends,

1' other taans aw rooam,

Aw find ther's nowt con mak amends

For what aw've left at hooam;

  

But as aw hurry throo ther streets

Noa matter tho' aw'm thrang,

Ha welcome if mi ear but greets

Mi own, mi native twang.

  

Why some despise it, aw can't tell,

It's plain to understand;

An sure aw am it saands as weel,

Tho'happen net soa grand.

  

Tell fowk they're courtin, they're enraged,

They call that vulgar slang;

But if aw tell 'em they're engaged,

That's net mi native twang.

  

Mi father, tho' he may be poor,

Aw'm net ashamed o' him;

Aw love mi mother tho' shoe's deeaf,

An tho' her e'en are dim;

  

Aw love th' owd taan; aw love to walk

Its crucken'd streets amang;

For thear it is aw hear fowk tawk

Mi own, mi native twang.

  

  

Aw like to hear hard-workin fowk

Say boldly what they meean;

For tho' ther hands are smeared wi' muck,

May be ther hearts are cleean.

  

An them 'at country fowk despise,

Aw say, "Why, let 'em hang;"

They'll nivver rob mi sympathies

Throo thee, mi native twang.

  

Aw like to see grand ladies,

When they're donn'd i' silks soa fine;

Aw like to see ther dazzlin e'en

Throo th' carriage winders shine;

  

Mi mother wor a woman,

An tho' it may be wrang,

Aw love 'em all, but mooastly them

'At tawk mi native twang.

  

Aw wish gooid luck to ivvery one;

Gooid luck to them 'at's brass;

Gooid luck and better times to come

To them 'ats poor—alas!

  

An may health, wealth, an sweet content

For ivver dwell amang

True, honest-hearted, Yorkshire fowk,

'At tawk mi native twang.

  

  

~ Translated by Ronnie Bray – Born 1935

~ Huddersfield, Yorkshire, England ~ ~ ~

  

  

Copyright © Ronnie Bray 

2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004 -2008

All Rights Reserved

  

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Mi Native Twang

By John Hartley

  

Translation for the Underprivileged 

  

They tell me I'm a vulgar chap

That ought to go to school

To learn to talk like other folk

And not be such a fool.

  

But I've a notion, do you see,

Although it may be wrong,

The sweetest music is to me

My own, my native tongue.

  

And when away from all my friends

In other towns I roam

I find that nothing makes amends

For what I've left at home.

  

But as I hurry through the streets

No matter how busy I am,

How welcome to my ear the sound

Of my own, my native twang.

  

Why some despise it I can't tell.

It's plain to understand.

And I am sure is sounds as well,

Though maybe not so grand.

  

  

Tell folk they're courting, they're enraged,

They call that vulgar slang.

But if I say that they're 'engaged,'

That's not my native twang!

  

My father, though he may be poor,

I'm not ashamed of him.

I love my mother though she's deaf,

And though her eyes are dim.

  

I love the old town, I love to walk

Among its crooked streets.

For there it is I hear folk talk

My own, my native twang.

  

  

I like to hear hard working folk

Say boldly what they mean.

For though their hands are smeared with dirt

I know their hearts are clean.

  

  

And those that country folk despise,

I say, 'Why, let them hang!'

They'll never move my love

For you, my native twang.

  

I like to see grand ladies

When they're dressed in silks so fine.

I like to see their flashing eyes

Through carriage windows shine.

  

My mother was a woman,

And though it might be wrong

I love them all, but chiefly those

That speak my native twang.

  

I wish good luck to everyone;

Good luck to those that are rich.

Good luck and better time to come

To those that are poor - alas!

  

And may health, wealth, and sweet content

Forever dwell among

True, honest-hearted Yorkshire Folk

That speak my native twang.